Quiet Air for the Studio


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Quiet Air for the Studio
1011101Quiet Air for the StudioThe background noise levels in recording studios, control rooms, and listening rooms must be kept under control if these rooms are to be of maximum use in their intended way. Hums, buzzes, rumbles, aircraft noises, tooting auto horns, dogs barking, or typewriter sounds are most incongruous if audible during a lull in a program. Such sounds might not be noticed outside the studio when they are a natural part of the situation, but during a pause or a quiet musical or speech passage they stand out like the proverbial sore pollex.In a studio, interfering …
Citation
F. Alton Everest: Master Handbook of Acoustics, Fourth Edition. Quiet Air for the Studio, Chapter (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2001), AccessEngineering Export