Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy


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Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy
10111051011304Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy
Potential Energy Consider a hockey puck sliding across an ice rink. Because of its motion, it has kinetic energy. As it slides, it does work against the force of friction and steadily slows to a stop. When at rest, the puck has no kinetic energy. The kinetic energy of the puck has been lost to heat in doing work against friction, and we cannot get it back. Friction is an example of a nonconservative force. This means that the mechanical energy of an object or of a system is not conserved when friction forces are present…
Citation
Michael Browne: Schaum's Outline of Physics for Engineering and Science, Third Edition. Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy, Chapter (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2013), AccessEngineering Export